In this course, you will learn about the marketing process and examine the range of marketing decisions that an organization must make in order to sell its products and services. You will also learn how to think like a marketer, discovering that the focus of marketing has always been on the consumer. You will begin to ask, "Who is the consumer of goods and services?” What does the consumer need? What does the consumer want?

The course aims to equip students with business communication skills and to impact the ability to communicate effectively through various communication tools in a modern business setting. The relevance of effective communication in corporate meetings and the market place is an emphasis of this course.

The course aims to equip students with the concept of business environment, its meaning, scope and importance. Students will be exposed to the global environment of business and how it affects strategic decisions of organizations as they act locally but with a global outlook.

This course is intended to provide the knowledge of instant risk identification and expose the methods of risk evaluation, management and control thereof. The course also introduces the concept of enterprise risk management.

This is the first of two Elementary Greek level courses (BL 501 and BL 502 or Greek 1 and 2), taught at AIU. The two Elementary Greek courses focus on forms and are in preparation for the Exegesis of Greek Narrative course (BL 601 or Greek 3) which focuses on function (syntax, shades) of verb tenses and exegesis of Greek narrative text. Similarly, the Elementary Greek courses prepare the student for Exegesis of Greek Epistolary Literature (BL 602 or Greek 4) which focuses on function (syntax, shades) of noun cases and the exegesis of Greek epistles. The two Elementary Greek courses also provide the opportunity for the student to start building his or her knowledge of Greek vocabulary. T

BL 601 or Greek 3 focuses on function (syntax, shades) of verb tenses and exegesis of Greek narrative text.

This course studies the Pentateuch, which consists of the first five books of the Old Testament—Genesis to Deuteronomy—and analyzes its contents, literary structure, theology and historical background.

This course examines the history and problems of interpretation of the biblical text; examining the nature, principles, tools and problems in interpretation of biblical literature. It deals with issues about the source of meaning, whether in the author, the text or the reader. It gives the students experience in working on various genres – such as narrative and poetry, and in exposition of the Bible text. In each exercise, the student is required to relate the message of the text as it might have been understood by the original readers to a modern context (in Africa and elsewhere in the world).

This Course is an exegetical study of the Epistle to the Hebrews to gain general mastery of the Epistle's content, developing argument, and theological synthesis.

This course lays the foundation for a strong theoretical and conceptual orientation on issues of sustainable community development. It helps students to acquire relevant and practical knowledge, skills and competencies that will enable them to participate in community development activities as they empower people and their communities to grow into what God desires for them. Biblical and other worldviews of development will be examined.

This course enhances some of the effective approaches pertaining to the teaching and learning processes. It examines the principles behind instructional process of education at various levels and with subject areas and emphasizes the preparation of materials of the learning process and the various alternatives instructional designs available to the teacher to ensure effectiveness in the classroom. The aim is to enable the student to become a better teacher in his/her subject area of choice and be able to articulate a teaching philosophy based on the Christian principles and integrate the teaching techniques offered in the course to real life teaching events.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the learner to the concepts of history and foundation of education, as well as traditional education played an effective role in learning and teaching process on human experiences, and its includes educational development in the past (early man and education), Greek Education Roman Education, African Indigenous Education , Medieval education , Islamic Education and theories relate to history of education. The learner will appreciate the role of socialization history in the shaping of an individual’s faith.

Educational research is the process of gathering information in order to improve the quality of education by increasing our knowledge of how people learn and how they can best be taught.   This course will therefore, benefit all educators, not just those who are planning to write a thesis/project because becoming an informed researcher and consumer of educational research is key to improving our professional practice.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the learner to child development and Family relation. The course will introduce the learner to the concept of developmental stages which are relevant to school and church education to enable him/her to minister to children, youth and adults at their developmental levels and needs.

To provide the student with historical and philosophical contexts for understanding contemporary educational issues and practices especially as these relate to the educational task of the Christian community. The course examines major events, trends and movements in educational thought from preliterate societies to early non-western civilizations to the classical Greek and Greco-Roman periods and onto present Africa.

This course aims to introduce students to biblical and modern theories of business management and its basic principles as well as develop knowledge and skills in the application of management functions: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.

This course aims at covering physical and human geography of East Africa; the theories of physical land formation, the hydrology, climate, soil and vegetation of East Africa. The course will also give the learner knowledge about his specific geographical l ocation as determined by God for specific purposes.

This course explores different civilizations and globally interconnected systems around the globe in the period between the 13th and the 21st centuries. It highlights how people acted, what they thought and felt and how their acts and thoughts continue to influence us today. It will touch on different themes that help promote a better understanding of how various historical forces such as cultural, social and political shaped the courses of civilizational developments and global interconnections in this particular time period.

This course introduces the students to the field of research in the social sciences.  It is designed to help students to conceptualize a research problem and create a viable research plan.

To survey the history of Christianity from Pentecost to the dawn of the Reformation, to explore the conditions and issues during these years that parallel conditions and issues in contemporary Africa, and to give to African Christians an overview of their Christian spiritual, theological, social, and organizational heritage.

To survey the history of Christianity from the Reformation to the present with a special note of the growth of Christianity in Africa and the conditions and issues during these years that parallel conditions and issues in contemporary Africa.

Course Purpose


The intention of this course is to give Islam’s supreme prophet, Abdul Casim Muhammad a full hearing by reading Islam’s primary sources: namely, the Qur’an and the biography Muhammad by Ibn Ishaq. In this course you will come to a verdict on Muhammad’s message based on his own words and biography. You will do so as an ‘academic’ jury. The readings, assignments and videotaped lectures will cover the Life of Muhammad by following Ibn Ishaq’s biography as we read through the entire Qur’an in chronological order. These two primary texts constitute the undisputed foundation from which evolved all other expressions of Islam: namely, the Hadiths, the Sunna, Sharia laws, Islamic theology, Islamic history, Islamic culture, Islamic architecture, and the relationship of Muslims with each other, with Jews and Christians, and with ‘pagan’ cultures.

Part I of this present course will cover Muhammad’s 12-year career in Mecca. Part II, which follows, will do the same for his 10-years at Medina. At the end of Part II we will explore the immediate historical developments after Muhammad’s death and begin to wrestle with how differently Muslims and even Christians attempt to interpret Muhammad and the Qur’an. This we will do with the help of reading a few secondary sources which present multiple interpretations of Muhammad and the Qur’an.

Only Muslim clerics (imams, mullahs, ayatollahs, sheikhs, qadis, etc.) and Muslim intellectuals are required to read what you will read in this course. So do not be surprised if your Muslim friends will not have read as much as you have. For them, Islam is a religion of imitating ‘the right deeds’, not a religion of studying their own texts. Unlike them, however, this course will make you a ‘student of Islam’; the way a nurse or a physician becomes a student of the human body. You study it to understand why it functions as it does in the lives of Muslims.

Upon successful completion of this class (Part I and Part II)...

  1. Students will be able to remember key Islamic terms, Qur’anic personal names and both Qur’anic and Muslim vocabulary. Students will be able to understand the core Islamic beliefs and be able to correctly describe Muhammad’s Qur’anic worldview. 
  2. Students will be able to correlate key events in Muhammad’s life to his evolving self-perception and doctrines, as well as to compare and contrast Muhammad’s core message and rituals to the Jewish and Christian equivalents of his time. They will able to draw connections between the Qur’an and Islamic behavior, Islamic culture and Muslim rituals. They will be able to differentiate Islam from other monotheistic faiths – understanding Islam based upon the claims found in the Qur’an.
  3. Students will be able to compare Qur’anic translations and understand how various kinds of Muslims use the Qur’an with different interpretations. Students will be able to form a clear verdict as to the nature of Muhammad, the Qur’an and Islam.
  4. Students will be able to discriminate between the contents of Meccan and Medinan revelations in light of the chronology of their “revelation” according to the Sira and Muslim commentaries. They will be able to identify Muhammad’s apocryphal sources, critique Muhammad’s use of revelations to resolve personal issues, and deconstruct his message from a political leadership perspective.
  5. Students will be able to appraise the validity of Muhammad’s message from a Christian perspective and defended their verdict in writing. They will be able to assess competing views of Muhammad, and discriminate between classical and liberal treatment of Islam.
  6. Students will be able to accurately understand Islam as it is found in the Qur’an and Sira, and be able to discuss with Muslims, with Christians and with secularists, the nature of Islam and its implications for contemporary events.

This course equips you with an understanding of the major ways that languages are affected by, and affect, the societies in which they are spoken, and with skills in investigating, understanding, and describing such relationships in a given society. We will reflect on our own social-linguistic experience and knowledge, and learn about each other's experience and knowledge. We will pay special attention to multilingual societies of Africa and the relationship of sociolinguistics with other branches of linguistics, both descriptive and applied.

The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand and appreciate the nature and role of Bible translation from various perspectives: historical, sociological, comparative religious, cultural, and theological. The course also provides an overview of development projects involving vernacular literacy and translation in Africa today.

The main aim of the course is to investigate the discourse-level structure of four narrative texts in the student’s own language, and then apply the results of these investigations to the translation of Acts 16:16–40. Where Acts 16:16–40 has already been translated into the student’s language, the student will evaluate the quality of an existing translation with respect to the discourse features studied during the course.

This course is designed to help students to understand an religio-cultural complex of Islam, which is expressed through popular beliefs and practices. In this course, Muslim cultural features will be examined in terms of a dichotomous modeling: the ideological dimension (“official Islam”) and the practical religio-cultural synthesis (“folk Islam” or “popular Islam”). Consideration is given to Muslim worldviews and their felt needs from a cross-cultural and missiological viewpoint.

The main purpose of this course is to prepare the post graduate student both for his/her academic career as well as his/her future work by studying the biblical concept of calling and the mission of God as themes and frameworks with which to integrate one's faith with study and work. The fundamental idea of the course is that we cannot know our calling until we find our place in the mission of God. The call of God is not just a call to ministry but a call to life and to the three main spheres of life: work, play and love

The purpose of this course is to equip the learner with knowledge, skills and attitudes from social psychology and its application in understanding human behavior in counseling.

The main purpose of this course is to prepare the students both for his/her academic career as well as his/her current/future work by studying the biblical concept of calling and the mission of God as themes and frameworks with which to integrate one’s faith with life.  The call of God is not just a call to ministry but a call to all aspects of life.

This course helps the student to be biblically literate. It empowers the student in acquiring competency in the use of the various Bible interpretation tools and in developing qualifications of a Bible interpreter. Through this course, the student will be able to develop skills that will enhance holistic growth and engagement.

This course helps the student to be biblically literate. It empowers the student in acquiring competency in the use of the various Bible interpretation tools and in developing qualifications of a Bible interpreter. Through this course, the student will be able to develop skills that will enhance holistic growth and engagement.

This course designed to equip the student with the competency skills and attitude necessary for library research. Students learn the effective use of research tools to locate, select, retrieve, and evaluate information in all formats to produce a quality term paper.

Christian life is a life-long journey toward the will and purpose of God. This course seeks to understand and implement the meaning and practice of Christian spiritual formation by delving into the teachings of Bible, traditions, and contemporary spiritual theologians and pastors.

The purpose of this course is to prepare the learner to undertake various courses in the degree programme. The course provides an exposure to the student of the various areas of ICT and their basic concepts.

The course is designed to equip the students to apply correct grammar usage in well constructed sentences in both spoken and written communication. It examines all aspects of English Grammar and equip the students with necessary skills to do basic research and write academic papers.

The purpose of this course is to enable students to learn psychological principles that can explain human behavior, can be used to prevent illness or facilitate healing.

The course is a systematic study of the social behaviours that have been learned through a long term of interaction among individuals or between human groups in a given institutionalized structure called “society.” This study attempts to examine the basic features of society and diverse characteristics of social structure, socio-cultural meanings, social groups and institutions, ethnic differentiations, gender issues, social stratifications, social deviance, social change, and the like.